Pro Bono Opportunity – Daylight

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Daylight is a justice collective that began with an idea that justice work should cross disciplines, sectors, and national boundaries. Justice is not defined by law, political institutions, or international standards. Instead, Daylight looks to build community justice by strengthening culturally competent voices demanding and leading change.


Daylight is currently seeking volunteers for two pro bono projects: the Police Reform project and the Child Welfare project.


The Police Reform project is focused primarily on the US, although some comparative examples might be useful. We will look at what is not working with respect to police reform processes in the US with judicial oversight or other outside oversight pursuant to a consent decree, trial order, or other litigation, or oversight by another external body with real authority. We would like to examine what has been done in the name of reform, whether it has been effective, why or why not, and what specific issues have been identified as barriers to real substantive change or have been considered lessons learned. The project initially requires a nationwide survey of relevant literature but could also include some interviews and additional research depending on the students’ interest and skill.


The Child Welfare project is looking at the operation of child welfare and child protection authorities internationally, but particularly in Western countries. It has been said that this is an area of racial discrimination affecting women deeply, sometimes referred to as #thenewjanecrow. We want to look at data relating to this but also legal interventions at the subnational, national and international levels (i.e., European Court of Human Rights, etc.).  Many Western nations (not the US) have ratified the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) and we want to look at how they adhere to the commitment to preserve the family and culture of children and the basis for which children are being removed or denied access to family. At a minimum, this involves a survey of literature, probably compiling relevant research and resources on a google drive, and developing some summary and analysis to inform our work.  We will then look at how these situations play out with respect to race, offering some intersectional analysis.


To apply, send a resume and statement of interest (specify which project you are applying to) to pilc.info@nyu.edu. The initial deadline is September 25, but we will continue to accept applications on a rolling basis afterwards.

Posted in: PUBLIC INTEREST LAW CENTER (PILC) | Tags: , , .