Fixing U.S. International Taxation by Daniel Shaviro – Monday, April 28th, 12:30 PM to 1:50 PM – Vanderbilt Hall Room 220, 40 Washington Square South

GTP header

Please join us for a discussion of Professor Daniel Shaviro’s current book, Fixing U.S. International Taxation (Oxford University Press, 2014). 

Following a presentation by Professor Shaviro of key themes from the book, leading experts in the field will offer commentary.  We are thrilled that Martin Sullivan, Chief Economist at Tax Analysts (publisher of Tax Notes), and Professor Itai Grinberg, Georgetown University Law Center, will join us.  We will also save time for a question-and-answer session with the audience.

To RSVP for this event, please click here .

A brief description of Fixing U.S. International Taxation is below:

“International tax rules, which determine how countries tax cross-border investment, are increasingly important with the rise of globalization, but the modern U.S. rules, even more than those in most other countries, are widely recognized as dysfunctional. The existing debate over how to reform the U.S. tax rules is stuck in a sterile dialectic, in which ostensibly the only permissible choices are worldwide or residence-based taxation of U.S. companies with the allowance of foreign tax credits, versus outright exemption of the companies’ foreign source income.  In Fixing U.S. International Taxation, Daniel N. Shaviro explains why neither of these solutions addresses the fundamental problem at hand, and he proposes a new reformulation of the existing framework from first principles. He shows that existing international tax policy frameworks are misguided insofar as they treat “double taxation” and “double non-taxation” as the key issues, conflate the distinct questions of what tax rate to impose on foreign source income and how to treat foreign taxes, and use simplistic single-bullet global welfare norms in lieu of a comprehensive analysis.  Drawing on tools that are familiar from public economics and trade policy, but that have been under-utilized in the international tax realm, Shaviro offers a better analysis that not only reshapes our understanding of the underlying issues, but might point the way to substantially improving the prevailing rules, both in the U.S. and around the world.”  The book is available on Amazon here .

We hope that you will join us for what promises to be an illuminating discussion.  Light refreshments will be served.  The event will be held on Monday, April 28th, 12:30 PM to 1:50 PM in Vanderbilt Hall Room 220, 40 Washington Square South.